This is how Farmers Insurance treats their Agents and their Families

This is an open letter to all Farmers Insurance Agents from the widow of a recently deceased Farmers Insurance Agent.
My husband became a Farmers Agent 35 years ago in 1980. He was one of the top producing agents for his Regional
Office for the next 17 years with a stellar record of making all the achievement clubs every single year including Life and
Commercial Masters, Life and Commercial Round Table, Toppers club and Championship. He was even chosen as a
Presidents Council member twice.

In the late 1990s he was diagnosed with stage IV cancer of the colon and liver with a chance of survival that was less
than 15%. After undergoing semi-experimental, aggressive and extensive surgeries, a year of topical and systemic
chemotherapy and 5 weeks of grueling radiation, he managed to become cancer free and continue living, albeit with
somewhat impaired health and with less energy than before. He also had to learn to live with some of the side effects
of aggressive treatments stemming from impaired liver functions. The disease was an eye opener in many ways. The
first thing my husband realized was that the life insurance policies that he so good at selling did not really contribute to
agency building. One needed property and casualty policies for continued for renewal revenue. Being in the Los Angeles
metropolitan area he also knew that auto and home policies would come and go as Farmers Insurance did not really
provide a competitively priced product. He always liked the commercial side of insurance so he started building on that
side of the business. Of course as most agents know, the Farmers appetite in this area is very limiting, and therefore a
substantial amount of business had to be placed outside of the Farmers Group of companies.

Any agent who has been with Farmers long enough knows the carrot and stick approach the company uses to keep their
agents productive. Although my husband’s contract was the original 1980’s version with no requirement for production,
and freedom to place business outside if it does not fit the Farmers appetite, the insurance company started putting the
pressure on for my husband to be more productive. They had no consideration for the fact that my husband no longer
had the ability to work the 16 hours days he used to put in before he became sick. They threatened him with a multitude
of consequences, once with taking away the 500 and 700 accounts he had been given to service as other agents had
left or been terminated. Other times management walked in and randomly audited files for “misplaced” business (lucky
for us we extensively documented each file for declinations before placing it outside of Farmers). Another time a District
Agency Manager came into our office and very rudely tried to make my husband “retire” or resign, with no evidence
of any wrongdoing on my husband’s side. My husband, always the gentleman, allowed this representative of Farmers
Insurance rant and rave, with his district manager right there and unable to say anything. Eventually I interrupted the tirade
and pointed out to this man all that my husband had been through and all the side effects he lived with. That ended this
meeting, obviously with the realization that if any unreasonable steps were taken by Farmers, my husband would have an
airtight reason to sue for wrongful termination.

In February of this year my husband passed away after a rapid deterioration in health and multiple organ failure.
Throughout his somewhat lengthy hospitalization our son and I maintained his office, kept full office hours, and provided
full service to our Farmers Insurance policyholders. I had always been a part of my husband’s office, managing the office
and providing service support to his clients. I am fully licensed so everything was done properly and professionally. My
son is also a licensed producer and therefore we had a fully licensed staff in place even though the agent was unable to
be in the office. After my husband’s passing we tried to maintain reasonable office hours in order to service the clients.
The District Manager was full of sympathy and attended the funeral. The regional management wrote a glowing letter of
support and condolences and donated generously to the school my husband had always supported.

However, at the same time while I was in deep shock and full of grief, the District Manager started asking me what my
intentions were as far as the Farmers book of business was concerned.  He advised me anything I worked on from the
date of his death we would not be paid for. About ten days after his passing, I came into the office, turned on the agency
Dashboard and found I had no access. Still clueless, I called the helpdesk and was informed there was no such agent
in their system! I still had the Farmers files but I was unable to provide service to anyone. With no warning of any sort,
the management at Farmers had disconnected my husband’s agency. I still had not advised them as to what my family’s
intentions were. For all they knew, one of my sons or I could have wanted to continue on as a Farmers Agent.

However, my sons and I already knew the true nature of what it meant to be a Farmers agent. We knew there was more
stick than carrot in the way agents were treated. The 35 years my husband had been their agent had taught us both sides
of the Face of Farmers.

Soon after this, I received a letter from Farmers Insurance advising me that although I had promptly and diligently turned
in all of the files connected to my husband’s book of business to the District Manager, and also given them our dedicated
Farmers Insurance telephone number, I would not be paid the contract value for the next 90 days. My understanding is
that although I will not be paid for any policies I put in force after the day my husband died, they would have the right to
not pay me for any policies that lapsed or cancelled for the next 3 months. So as far as they are concerned my husband’s
contract stopped on the day he died, but the value of the agency could still decrease even though he was no longer an
agent. I wish someone could tell me how this can be legal! Even the district manager does not really know. He told me I
would probably be paid in 30 days. It has now been 45 days and I have not seen any checks from Farmers.

Therefore when an agent dies, his family is left high and dry with no income to even pay their bills if they rely solely on the
agent’s income from Farmers. Chances are a young agent’s family would be left in very dire straits if such an event were
to befall him. The intent of this letter is one of a cautionary tale. Who is going to pay your family’s or office bills if something
were to happen to you today? The new contract you might have signed really reins in your ability to have any form of
income outside of the Farmers agency. The Farmers Insurance Agents group life policy will not pay your family for at least
another 45 days and neither will the FNWL life insurance policy you might have purchased on yourself.

I am not an attorney, but I learned the hard way that when a sole proprietor dies his business dies with him. I am guessing
most Farmers agents might well be sole proprietors. Even as a corporation, the agent is always an individual. Agents need
to make sure they understand the ramifications of this in case something does happen to them. We sell life insurance to
protect families, and yet we do not really understand what can happen to our own families if suddenly we are no longer
there.

Mrs Vartan Karlubian

Source: UFAA The Voice

Farmers Insurance Get Worst Ratings

Farmers Insurance gets worst rating (1 star out of 5) by many ConsumerAffairs.com users!  Here are some of their comments:

“Our 2nd bad experience with Farmers. This time we were hit by a Farmers insured driver. Damage to our car and back injuries. The claims process has been a colossal joke. The claims agent is lazy, disrespectful and untrustworthy. They are trying to cheap their way out. It’s been five weeks with no resolution. However, they did offer us a rental car… which we don’t want or need! Helps me understand why insurance rates are through the roof because they try to take advantage of people which forces consulting with an attorney. Had they just settled fairly, it would have cost them $5,000. Now, we will demand much, much more. Farmers – yeah, they’ve seen a thing or two, but don’t know jack squat.”

Farmers Insurance Sucks

“We trusted our agent by telling him we bought a new Mercedes S550 and needed to add it to our coverage. 2 years later a rock crashed the windshield and the agent we trusted saved us a couple of dollars by making our comprehensive coverage deductible $1,250.00. WOW! Then on top of that they tell us if we don’t take it to an aftermarket repair shop they select they may not pay the complete cost after we pay our deductible. They take incompetence and greed to a whole new level. Too bad there is not a 0 Star rating.

I will never ever get an insurance through Farmers or recommend it to any one else for that matter. What a lousy business. I got in an car accident earlier this year, car was total loss and I sold it to a junk yard. I notified the agent but somehow she didn’t cancel my insurance and I was paying it for months. When I noticed it I contacted the agent and to get my money reimbursed. After months of asking me for all kind of evidence that I really don’t own the vehicle anymore (they saw the pictures and knew that the car was total loss) now they simply refuse to refund. I provided them the name of the junk yard AND more importantly hard evidence: the notice of transfer and reliability of the DMV (that states I don’t own the car any more and from which date). That’s not enough for Farmers. What a despicable way of doing business and customer service!”

“Recently totaled my 2003 Z71 Tahoe. The mileage on my vehicle with just 190K, it was in immaculate condition with no issues. Insurance came back and told me they were willing to give me $4500 for it. This is absolutely ludicrous as of this particular vehicle will cost about $9500. For what they are offering me, I cannot even replace my vehicle with the same exact vehicle in the same condition. Their offer will not even cover half of what they’re going for. They say they are going based off blue book value but would consider upping it if I can show them proof that these vehicles go for more in this area.
I have sent them countless examples of what they go for in this area but they will not consider them because they are either one your new were one year older. Apparently 2003 Z71 Tahoes are rare in this area. I guess it doesn’t matter that 2002 models just like it are going for well over what they are even offering me for mine and those are in bad condition. This is absolutely ridiculous. I pay to be covered and I get nothing in return.

“I had someone rear end my 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee over a year ago. Farmers paid for the repair with no problem. However, under Oregon law you are also entitled to receive compensation for “Diminished Value”. An accident will lower the resale value of your vehicle no matter how beautifully the repair was made. That’s diminished value (or DV) and you are entitled to compensation for that additional loss. I had two DV estimates done by reputable companies and they both estimated that loss at over $5,000. You pay these companies to do this estimate and you have no idea what they value your loss at until you pay them and see the report. They get paid the same either way so there is no incentive for them to lie or inflate the value of the loss. It’s an honest assessment. Farmers came back and said their expert valued the same loss at no more than $2,000. I refused the $2,000 and they came back with $2,250.
I complained that my vehicle suffered structural damage and that $2,250 is ridiculous. They came back with $2,500. This has been dragging on for over a year now and their offer is still less than half of the estimated loss. I chose Farmers because I believed they were a reputable company. This is not what I would have expected from them at all. Their adjuster even had the audacity to tell me my accident wasn’t showing on CarFax and suggested I not mention the accident during a sale. I’m required by law to tell the buyer about this accident, especially since it involved structural damage! In fact, if I sold it to a dealership, I’d be required to sign a document of disclosure. Are these the actions of a reputable company? Is this the kind of service you would want to experience? Be your own judge. What good is paying for insurance if they treat you like this when you need them? Do yourself a favor and steer clear off Farmers.

Farmers Insurance has been the worst experience of my life. I was sideswiped by one of their client who was ticketed for the accident. I was traveling eastbound in the curb lane at the posted speed limit. The Farmers client made an illegal left turn into the center lane of the same street as me and then abruptly made a lane change into my rear driver’s side door. The Farmer’s customer raced through an expired left turn arrow and lost control of his vehicle due to excessive speed. Farmers lied and said I turned right on red which is patently false. What happened was their client made an illegal left turn AFTER the left turn arrow expired and then about 5-6 car lengths down the road struck my vehicle. Suffice it to say, Farmers Insurance are liars, cheats and swindlers.
I would NEVER recommend Farmers Insurance to anyone. Lies lead to more lies. Small lies become big lies. If Farmers is so willing to tell lies then they will lie to their victims and ultimately their customers. Farmers Insurance company cannot be trusted and pray that you never have to deal with them. They are crooked and some of the most dishonest and untrustworthy people on earth. BUYER BEWARE!!”
Farmers Insurance Sucks

“I have had auto/home insurance with Farmers for 15 years. With few if any claims I have been responsible for. In all auto related issues concerning disputes my Farmers agent in Santa Rosa consistently took the side of the company. The customer service has gone downhill over the 15 years. Recently my agent informed me I would be paying a increased premium for my Subaru WRX 5door hatchback. He said it was in a “performance/sports car” category. When I requested Farmers policy documentation details indicating a list of “performance/sports car” data it was not provided. When I contacted the Farmers District Manager he also refused to provide the information. I have an outstanding driving record. Assigning an extra insurance premium on my Subaru has nothing to do with my record. Cars do not break the law! People do! The “performance/sports car” category has nothing to do with my driving record.
Farmers Auto Insurance created that category for the purpose of increasing profits for the company. I requested documentation that Farmers would have to provide to the California Department of Insurance in approval of the “performance/sports car” category. Farmers failed to respond or provide information. I now have a formal complaint filed with the Ca. Dept. of Insurance against Farmers for non-disclosure and being in violation of corporate law related to lack of transparency. I would suggest that people never do business with Farmers Auto Insurance company. The complaints against them are substantial.

“I’ve been working with Michael ** from Farmers Insurance for the last 2 weeks and HE’S THE ABSOLUTE WORST. 2 weeks ago one of their insured hit me when he ran a stop sign at an intersection, doing significant damage to my car. The front passenger side was completely bent in, leaving a big gap with an air bubble. I called them and asked them to send someone over to do an estimate and Michael told me they don’t usually do that unless the car isn’t driveable, that I’d have to go to a shop and have them do it. I tried to explain to him that the car ISN’T driveable, that I just don’t feel safe driving it in its current state but he just didn’t care and insisted I had to bring it to a shop to get an estimate.
I finally found a shop that could accommodate my schedule and location and they took a look at my car and told me I need to call Farmers and tell them to give me a rental, because this car isn’t driveable. Only then did Michael set me up with a rental. After I got my rental from Enterprise, they told me that Farmers refused to cover my damage waiver on the rental because my insurance already covers a lot of that. I called Michael and asked that Farmers cover my damage waiver and surprise surprise, he said they don’t usually do that. I pointed out that the accident was 100% their driver’s fault and he said OK, they’ll cover my damage waiver but first I have to get my insurance company to fax them a copy of my declaration.
I spent the next 2 days running around making sure all the appropriate documents were sent over (with Michael giving me the runaround repeatedly), and finally he called me and informed me that they won’t be covering my damage waiver because my own insurance company already covers a lot of that. I’m so appalled at the way Farmers has treated me. They’ve just made everything as difficult for me as possible, and Michael is all smiles and politeness on the surface but really has no sense of decency whatsoever. He’s not even professional by auto-insurance standards. (And that’s saying a lot!) If I incur any financial damages from this experience I fully plan to sue them.”

“Had a house fire. 2 days later I still have not heard from my insurance adjuster. I have called the claims # to start a claim, I was told the ins. adjuster would contact me asap… This never happened, so I call again and get the same runaround. Call a 3rd time and they give me more runaround and tell me I have to call the adjuster myself, so I did, no answer and no callback!!! I have no power in my home. I’m living wherever I can, even staying in my house with all the bad smoke fumes etc… I cannot believe that Farmers ins. has put this off like they have, for goodness sakes!!! It is my home. I have insurance and cannot get an adjuster to come here and do what is needed to get my home back in order!!! For shame on this company.

“Farmers ins keeps jacking up your rates. Had no claims. Save over 100$ per month on car ins by switching away for them. If you’re with Farmers I’d shop around now. If thinking about Farmers ins they will double your payments in a matter of year or two. I have been driving over 30 yrs. Never had a company take advantage of me so bad.

Reviews from: https://www.consumeraffairs.com/insurance/farmers_auto.html

 

Farmers Insurance Charges $54 to Cancel Insurance?

I have the worst experience ever with Farmers Insurance. I wanted to cancel my insurance because I sold my car. I purposely told my insurance agent the day before my next insurance cycle that I wanted to cancel. She told me that the system might not be able to recognize my cancellation by midnight and thus I might still be charged for the next month. But she will let the company know and get me a refund ASAP if that happens. Turns out, I got charged the next day. Then my agent sent me this unclear statement saying I owe the policy 54 dollars (I did not owe anything or been in any accident). I was confused so I called and she told me she will ask the company and get back to me because apparently she doesn’t know what is going on either. I waited for more than a week, didn’t get a penny back. And so I called again and she said it is from another department and she will have to get back to me next week. Luckily this time she got back to me early saying there’s a cancellation fee of 54 dollars being charged. so I will be getting a refund of my monthly payment that was accidentally charged after the cancellation 105 – the cancellation fee 54 dollars. First of all, I have never heard something like a cancellation fee when you want to cancel your car insurance. It is a competitive market and all the insurance company try to keep their customers satisfied to build up the reputation. But Farmers is almost like since “the system” has already charged you for an extra month, we might as well come up with something and let you suck it up. And ha there is the cancellation fee. Throughout the whole time, the charges and refund were so unclear. Even when I ask for a clear statement of how they came up with the number they charged me, they never provided that. And each time they tell me different excuses. I would never use/recommend Farmers Insurance to anyone. Avoid it as much as you can

Source: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/insurance/farmers-insurance-review/

Farmers Insurance Hit With Class Action Lawsuit After LA Wildfire

By Brandon Lowrey

A Los Angeles homeowner hit a Farmers Insurance Co. unit with a proposed class action in California state court on Wednesday alleging the insurers illegally limited coverage of wildfire smoke damage by changing policies without adequate notice and saying it was “not actual fire damage.”
Plaintiff Ismael Frias, a resident of the Los Angeles suburb of Sylmar, said that Mid-Century Insurance Co. applied a $5,000 “Wildfire Smoke Sublimit” to his claim under his homeowner’s insurance policy. Mid-Century allegedly added the sublimit to the policy when Frias renewed in March, but didn’t clearly notify him. Frias also contends that the sublimit violates California a insurance law standardizing fire damage policies.

“The purported $5,000.00 Wildfire Smoke Sublimit violates Insurance Code section 2071, is not reflected on the declarations Page, is not plain, clear and conspicuous, and is unenforceable,” Frias argued.

Frias made a claim for damages he suffered during a wildfire on July 23. On that date, the massive Sand Canyon Fire was raging through the mountains north of Sylmar. The fire ultimately scorched nearly 65 square miles before it was contained in August, according to the National Wildfire Coordinating Group.

In September, Frias received a letter from Mid-Century saying the damage to his home wasn’t “actual fire damage” and thus was subject to the $5,000 sublimit, according to the complaint.

Frias alleges claims of breach of contract, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and violation of California’s Unfair Competition Act.

Frias seeks to establish a class of California homeowners who had policies containing the wildfire smoke sublimit and who had submitted claims for wildfire odor, soot, smoke, char or ash damage. He also seeks compensatory and punitive damages, along with attorney’s fees, according to the complaint.

“As a result of defendants’ conduct, plaintiff and members of the class and subclass have been damaged, including but not limited to, paying insurance premiums for coverage rendered illusory by the unlawful Wildfire Smoke Sublimit,” the complaint said.

Representatives for Farmers did not immediately respond to requests for comment Wednesday.

Frias is represented by Joshua H. Haffner and Levi M. Plesset of Haffner Law PC.

Counsel information for the defendants was not immediately available.

The case is Ismael Frias et al. v. Farmers Group Inc. et al., case number BC638626, in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of Los Angeles.

—Editing by Joe Phalon.

Source: law360.com

Farmers Insurance pays to settle complaint under Missouri no-call list law

Farmers Insurance agreed to pay a $575,000 settlement to Missouri in a case that accused the company of continuing to call people after they had requested an end to the calls in violation of law that permits no-call lists.

By Mark Davis mdavis@kcstar.com

Farmers Insurance agreed to pay $575,000 to Missouri to settle a lawsuit that charged it had violated the state’s law that allows consumers to be on a no-call list.

It agreed also to provide agent training and audits of agents, according to an announcement Monday by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster.

More than 275 complaints from consumers led Koster to take action against California-based Farmers Insurance Exchange, Truck Insurance Exchange and Fire Insurance Exchange. Koster said Farmers agents continued to call after being instructed by consumers not to call.

Farmers Insurance simply looked the other way while its agents were flouting Missouri’s no-call law, illegally bombarding Missouri consumers with unwanted telemarketing calls,” Koster said in the announcement. “This historic settlement combined with new training requirements should ensure Farmers reforms its practices to protect Missouri consumers.”

It is the largest amount paid by a telemarketer for violations, the state said.
Mark Davis: 816-234-4372, on Twitter @mdkcstar

Source: kansascity.com

Farmers Insurance Employee Discrimination

Farmers Insurance Exchange will pay a total of $225,000 to three former employees to settle a federal complaint of racial discrimination and retaliation.

By Tim Sheehan tsheehan@fresnobee.com

Farmers Insurance Exchange will pay $225,000 to three former employees to settle a federal complaint over racial discrimination and retaliation at its Fresno claims office.

U.S. District Court Judge Anthony Ishii approved the settlement on Wednesday and it was announced Thursday by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. It stems from a complaint filed by the EEOC in 2013 on behalf of two Hmong employees who were terminated in 2009, as well as a third employee who was allegedly fired for testifying to the EEOC in its investigation.

The EEOC charged that prior to 2009, supervisors had instructed employees at Farmers’ branch claims office in Fresno to code payments to customers as partial payments as a way of avoiding negative customer service surveys. But a 2009 audit led to interviews of claims representatives over the partial-payment coding. Two Hmong representatives, Chia Xiong and John Yang, were later terminated, the EEOC alleged, while non-Asian employees who had also coded some cases as partial payments were retained by the company.

The EEOC complaint alleged that Farmers terminated two of its Asian employees for coding cases as partial payments “while retaining similarly situated non-Asian employees who had also coded cases as partial payments.”

After Xiong filed a complaint with the EEOC, a third employee, Jason Lowry, was interviewed by the federal agency in 2012 as part of its investigation. Within two weeks, Farmers questioned Lowry about his testimony to the EEOC, and the next day he was placed on leave. Six weeks later, Lowry was fired “due to his participation in the EEOC’s investigation,” according to the complaint.

Melissa Barrios, the EEOC Fresno office director, applauded the affected employees for coming forward with their experience with the company, “because oftentimes Asian and Pacific Islander communities are reluctant to complain.”

Under the terms of the settlement, Farmers does not admit any liability or wrongdoing.

In addition to the financial terms covering lost wages as well as damages for emotional distress, the consent decree requires Farmers to assign a monitor to its Fresno claims office to ensure compliance with federal fair employment laws, train supervisors and human-resources officers about the law and train employees about their legal rights.

“We commend Farmers Insurance Exchange for agreeing to make changes that will ensure compliance with federal law,” said Anna Park, regional attorney for the EEOC’s Los Angeles district, whose territory includes Fresno.

Tim Sheehan: 559-441-6319, @TimSheehanNews
Source: fresnobee.com

Farmers Insurance will pay a high price for discriminating against its female attorneys

Federal District Judge Lucy Koh had some very picky questions Thursday about terminology used in a multimillion-dollar settlement hammered out between Farmers Insurance and the hundreds of female attorneys it has underpaid for years.

I wasn’t expecting fireworks, exactly, but I thought things would be a little more lively for a case that could have a major effect on companies that, even unwittingly, pay men more than women for the same work.

Despite the technical questions coming from the bench, at least one person in the courtroom was absolutely riveted: Lynne Coates, a former Farmers attorney who discovered during a casual work conversation two years ago that a male colleague with less experience was earning more than she. Not too much later, she also found out her male litigation partner was being paid twice her salary — $185,000 versus $99,000. The man could hardly be considered more experienced than Coates; he earned his law license a year after she earned hers.

Coates, 50, complained to her manager, who responded by effectively demoting her, giving her work more suited to a paralegal than an experienced trial attorney.

It was embarrassing and humiliating,” she told me last year. “My job was taken away from me.”

She quit and filed a lawsuit, alleging Farmers had broken state and federal discrimination laws. Within months, nearly 300 female attorneys joined the class-action lawsuit. Nearly 200 of them are current Farmers attorneys.

Farmers has agreed to pay $4 million. As lead plaintiff, Coates will receive at least $85,000.

But more important, the company has also agreed to an impressive series of reforms, including increasing the number of women attorneys in its higher salary grades.

Also, for a period of three years, a company official will monitor compliance with the agreement, provide diversity training to attorneys and give progress reports to San Francisco attorney Lori Andrus, who represented Coates and the other plaintiffs, along with San Jose attorney Lori Costanzo.

“An excellent agreement,” Koh said.

“This is a substantial victory, and a good model going forward,” said UC Hastings law professor Joan Williams, an expert on workplace gender issues.

I wondered if three years was enough time to reverse decades of subtle workplace discrimination.

Andrus said she was pleased.  “We think it’s plenty of time for them to really, really clean up their act,” she said.

In the end, the case boiled down to a battle of statistics.

Farmers wanted to compare attorneys in small, individual branch offices, which Andrus and Costanzo resisted.  “If you look just at their San Jose office, which employs eight attorneys, it’s such a small number that comparing them makes it difficult to draw any conclusions,” she said. But when the salaries of Farmers attorneys all over the country were compared, Andrus said, “the wage gap quadrupled.”

Not surprisingly, greater disparity occurred at the higher salary grades. Perhaps the male attorneys in those grades had more experience than their female counterparts?  To control for that, Andrus and Costanzo looked at the dates each attorney passed the bar as a measure of experience.

“We found that women were much more likely to be in a lower salary grade,” Andrus said, “regardless of bar date.”

So although women and men were both hired into lower salary grades, women basically got stuck there.

“It’s not that women were being demoted,” Andrus said. “But a man would get groomed and promoted. Basically, there is male favoritism, which is probably unintentional. It’s a vestige of the good old boy network.”

Increasingly, employers are recognizing that pay gaps may be unintentional, but are unmistakably real.

Last year, the San Francisco-based tech giant Salesforce awarded $3 million in raises after discovering, through a voluntary salary analysis, that it had a gender wage gap. “We did find quite a few women who were being paid less than men and we’ve made that change,” Chief Executive Marc Benioff told CNN. “With just the push of one button, every CEO in the world can know exactly what is their pay discrepancy between men and women, and I hope that every CEO pushes that button.”

That would be nice.

“If we see more and more of these audits,” said California Democratic state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, “I think we are going to see major shifts.

Jackson co-authored a new state law, the California Fair Pay Act, that has been described as “one of the most aggressive” equal pay laws in the country. It was incorporated into the Farmers lawsuit on behalf of plaintiffs who still work at the company.

One reason the law has been hailed as a breakthrough is that it requires companies to pay employees equally for work that is substantially similar — not exactly the same. That is a critical twist.

“The pay scale for a janitor in a hotel is greater than a housekeeper,” Jackson said. “Why is that? The work is substantially similar, and yet most janitors are men, most housekeepers are women.”

The law also shifts the burden of proof. Bosses are now required to show that a wage differential is the result of a bona fide factor like education, training or experience, not sex.

In the court hallway after the hearing, Coates was beaming. “I feel good,” she said. “The changes that Farmers has agreed to implement are going to make such a difference for the women in the company, and that is what this is all about.”

Maybe so. This year, Andrus said, Farmers gave unscheduled raises of $10,000 to $13,000 to female attorneys who are plaintiffs in the lawsuit.

It’s a start. But barely.

robin.abcarian@latimes.com
Source: http://www.latimes.com/

Farmers Insurance gets worst rating for Renters Insurance

According to the JD Powers 2014 U.S. Household Insurance Study, Farmers Insurance got the WORST rating they could get for Renters Insurance in the following categories:
Overall Satisfaction
Policy Offerings
Price
Billing and Payment
Interaction

To top it off Farmers Insurance had the WORST Customer Satisfaction ranking of all the insurers.

2014-farmers-Insurance-rating

Source:http://ratings.jdpower.com and http://www.jdpower.com

 

Farmers Insurance gets worst rating for Homeowners Insurance Claims

According to the JD Powers 2014 U.S. Household Insurance Study, Farmers Insurance got the WORST rating they could get for Homeowners Insurance CLAIMS.

homeowners_insurance_claim

Source: http://ratings.jdpower.com

Farmers Insurance gets worst Auto Insurance ratings for 2014

In the JD Poj-d-power-logower 2014 U.S. Auto Insurance Ratings Farmers Insurance got the WORST rating it could get in the following categories:
-Overall Satisfaction
-Policy Offerings
-Price
-Billing and Payment
-Claims

auto collision

Source: http://ratings.jdpower.com

 

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